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  Flax Seed Oil Information


Alpha linolenic acid an omega 3 essential fatty acid in flax seed oil which lowers total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, helps lower blood triglycerides and blood pressure and reduces the risk of a heart attack.

Research indicates that the majority of western diets are deficient in the Omega-3 essential fatty acids. A deficiency of Omega-3 can he implicated in:

Coronary Artery Disease: A large number of studies show that oils containing Omega-3 can have a number of beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease. Omega-3's have been shown to reduce the cholesterol ratio, blood pressure, triglyceride levels, platelet aggregation (blood cloning tendency), artheroscierosis (plaque formation) and cardiac arrhythmia. See the Dangers of Trans Fatty Acids

  • Cancer: Omega-3 has been shown to selectively kill human cancer cells in tissue culture studies, without harming normal cells. Clinical studies are confirming the potential of high doses of Omega-3 to reduce tumor growth.


  • Arthritis: Several double blind studies have shown that when oils rich in Omega-3 are taken daily, about two thirds of patients are able to discontinue their non steroidal drugs and a further 20% can reduce their drug use.


  • Skin Problems: Skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis, eczema and other allergic conditions, and dry skin are related to an Omega-3 deficiency.


  • Stress: Some clinical studies have indicated a sense of calmness in response to Omega-3.


  • Growth and Development: Studies have shown that mothers require increased levels of Omega-3 during pregnancy and nursing for normal brain and eye development in their children.

Flaxseed Oil is the highest beneficial source of lignans. Lignans are estrogenically active compounds that can exert beneficial effects upon a dry and fragile vaginal mucosa.

Lignans, like many other plant steroids may give some protection against cancers occurring in hormone sensitive tissues such as the breasts and uterus. Lignans may also be beneficial to the immune system.

Flax Seed Oil while being free of cholesterol does contain valuable essential fatty acids of the omega 3 variety and also linolenic acid. These essential fatty acids are beneficial for the cardiovascular system and are essential for healthy skin, hair and mucous membranes. Essential fatty acids ensure healthy cell membranes and help to balance the prostaglandin hormonal system.

What good is a healthy body if the brain isn't functioning properly? Children with learning disabilities, ie. ADD, ADHD and behavior problems, have lower levels - deficiencies - in essential fatty acids. Flax Seed Oil helps adults and children with better brain function, memory and improved behavior.

Question: School officials say my 9-year-old daughter may have attention deficit disorder because the teacher says she can't stay focused.

They are putting her through a battery of tests and, in the meantime, have suggested giving her coffee and Mountain Dew for the caffeine. She is not hyper, nor does she have trouble sleeping, and I am concerned that loading her up with caffeine could cause problems. Is there any other way to help her avoid distraction?

Answer: Diagnosing attention deficit disorder can be complicated. We have found little data to support the use of caffeine for the symptoms of ADD. Coffee or high doses of caffeine can cause stomach upset, nausea, nervousness and insomnia and might bring on involuntary muscle twitches or tics, in some children. Although stimulants such as amphetamine and methylphenidate (Ritalin) can be helpful, not every child needs such powerful medication. Altering the environment to suit the individual's natural learning style can be valuable at home and at school.

Some physicians report that adding essential fatty acids (EFAs) to the diet in the form of flaxseed oil, cold-water fish or black-currant oil might also be beneficial.

Of the fifty or so known nutrients vital for survival, there are two essential fatty acids: Omega-3, and Omega-6. Our bodies are unable to produce these fatty acids and they must be obtained from food or supplements. Essential Fatty Acids are necessary for normal brain function, cell membrane formation, metabolism of cholesterol and triglycerides, and energy production on a cellular level.

Durham, N.C. -- A diet rich in flaxseed seems to reduce the size, aggressiveness and severity of tumors in mice that have been genetically engineered to develop prostate cancer, according to new research from Duke University Medical Center. And in 3 percent of the mice the flaxseed diet kept them from getting the disease at all.

Clinical studies by other researchers have suggested that dietary fiber reduces cancer risk, and omega-3 fatty acids also have shown a protective benefit against cancer. Flaxseed is the richest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids and is high in fiber. Also, flaxseed is a source of lignan, a specific family of fiber-related compounds that appear to play a role in influencing both estrogen and testosterone metabolism. Since testosterone may be important in the progression of prostate cancer, lignan could help inhibit the growth and development of the disease.
"Tumors in the untreated control group were twice the size of tumors in the flaxseed group," said Xu Lin, M.D., research associate, division of urology and lead author of the study. "The tumors were also less aggressive in the flaxseed group, and two of the mice in the flaxseed group did not develop prostate cancer at all. The rates of apoptosis (tumor cell death) were also higher in the flaxseed group. And while it was not statistically significant, the flaxseed group had fewer rates of the cancer spreading to other organs. "

While the results are promising, the researchers say they are not surprising. The study is the third in a series by the Duke Medical Center researchers to show the benefits of flaxseed in reducing the growth and development of prostate cancer.

The first study, published in July 2001 in Urology, demonstrated that a low-fat diet supplemented with flaxseed was associated with slower tumor growth. In this pilot study, 25 men with prostate cancer began adding ground flaxseed to their diets for 34 days. At the end of the study, the men saw a drop in testosterone levels and a trend toward lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, a marker for prostate cancer. The diet also was tolerated well and gave the authors hope for this dietary intervention.
The second study, published in the November-December 2001 issue of Anticancer Research, examined the effect lignans have on prostate cancer cell lines. This study showed that flaxseed-derived lignans inhibited the growth of three distinct human prostate cancer cell lines through hormonally dependent and independent mechanisms.

"So far we have observed the suppression of prostate cancer in humans, mice and at the cellular level," said Lin. "It's not a fluke or a coincidence. It's an encouraging line of research."

Omega 3 fatty acids are found in fish, flax seed oil, wheat germ and nuts. Basically there are "good fats" and "bad fats." As a nation we tend to consume far more of the bad fats found in margarine, corn oil, potato chips, cookies and the snacks we love to eat. Unfortunately, too many "bad fats" actually block the body's ability to use the "good fats." The remedy is to eat more fish and take Femhealth Flax Seed Oil and Omega 3 Fish Oil daily.

FH-82-2 Flax Seed Oil 1000mg 70 capsules $19.95


877-493-5987 U.S. Toll Free Order Line 9-6 Eastern







Durham, N.C. - A diet rich in flaxseed seems to reduce the size, aggressiveness and severity of tumors in mice that have been genetically engineered to develop prostate cancer, according to new research from Duke University Medical Center. And in 3 percent of the mice the flaxseed diet kept them from getting the disease at all.

Clinical studies by other researchers have suggested that dietary fiber reduces cancer risk, and omega-3 fatty acids also have shown a protective benefit against cancer. Flaxseed is the richest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids and is high in fiber. Also, flaxseed is a source of lignan, a specific family of fiber-related compounds that appear to play a role in influencing both estrogen and testosterone metabolism. Since testosterone may be important in the progression of prostate cancer, lignan could help inhibit the growth and development of the disease.

"Tumors in the untreated control group were twice the size of tumors in the flaxseed group," said Xu Lin, M.D., research associate, division of urology and lead author of the study. "The tumors were also less aggressive in the flaxseed group, and two of the mice in the flaxseed group did not develop prostate cancer at all. The rates of apoptosis (tumor cell death) were also higher in the flaxseed group. And while it was not statistically significant, the flaxseed group had fewer rates of the cancer spreading to other organs. "

While the results are promising, the researchers say they are not surprising. The study is the third in a series by the Duke Medical Center researchers to show the benefits of flaxseed in reducing the growth and development of prostate cancer.
The first study, published in July 2001 in Urology, demonstrated that a low-fat diet supplemented with flaxseed was associated with slower tumor growth. In this pilot study, 25 men with prostate cancer began adding ground flaxseed to their diets for 34 days. At the end of the study, the men saw a drop in testosterone levels and a trend toward lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, a marker for prostate cancer. The diet also was tolerated well and gave the authors hope for this dietary intervention.

The second study, published in the November-December 2001 issue of Anticancer Research, examined the effect lignans have on prostate cancer cell lines. This study showed that flaxseed-derived lignans inhibited the growth of three distinct human prostate cancer cell lines through hormonally dependent and independent mechanisms.

"So far we have observed the suppression of prostate cancer in humans, mice and at the cellular level," said Lin. "It's not a fluke or a coincidence. It's an encouraging line of research."

Research References For FlaxSeed Oil:

1. Nordstrom DC, Honkanen VE, Nasu Y, et al. Alpha-linolenic acid in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized study: flaxseed vs. safflower seed. Rheumatol Int 1995;14:231�4.

2. De Lorgeril M, Renaud S, Maelle N, et al. Mediterranean alpha-linolenic acid-rich diet in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Lancet 1994;343:1454�9.

3. Rice RD. Mediterranean diet. Lancet 1994;344;893�4 [letter].

4. Kelley DS, Nelson GJ, Love JE, et al. Dietary a-linolenic acid alters tissue fatty acid composition, but not blood lipids, lipoproteins or coagulation status in humans. Lipids 1993;28:533�7.

5. Abbey M, Clifton P, Kestin M, et al. Effect of fish oil on lipoproteins, lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase, and lipid transfer protein activity in humans. Arterioscler 1990;10:85�94.

6. Wensing AGCL, Mensink RP, Hornstra G. Effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from plant and marine origin on platelet aggregation in healthy elderly subjects. Br J Nutr 1999;82:183�91.

7. Chan JK, Bruce VM, McDonald BE. Dietary a-linolenic acid is as effective as oleic acid and linoleic acid in lowering blood cholesterol in normolipidemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;53:1230�4.

8. Singer P, Jaeger W, Berger I, et al. Effects of dietary oleic, linoleic and a-linolenic acids on blood pressure, serum lipids, lipoproteins and the formation of eicosanoid precursors in patients with mild essential hypertension. J Human Hypertension 1990;4:227�33.

9. Sanders TAB, Roshanai F. The influence of different types of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on blood lipids and platelet function in healthy volunteers. Clin Sci 1983;64:91.

10. Mantzioris E, James MJ, Gibson RA, Cleland LG. Dietary substitution with alpha-linolenic acid-rich vegetable oil increases eicosapentaenoic acid concentrations in tissues. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59:1304�49.

11. Indu M, Ghafoorunissa. n-3 fatty acids in Indian diets: comparison of the effects of precursor (alpha-linolenic acid) vs product (long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids). Nutr Res 1992;12:569�82.

12. Chajes V, Sattler W, Stranzl A, Kostner GM. Influence of n-3 fatty acids on the growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro: relationship to peroxides and vitamin E. Breast Cancer Res Treat 1995;34:199�212.

13. Mun�z SF, Silva RA, Lamarque A, et al. Protective capability of dietary Zizyphus mistol seed oil, rich in 18:3, n-3, on the development of two murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas with high or low metastatic potential. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 1995;53:135�8.

14. Thompson LU, Rickard SE, Orcheson LJ, Seidl MM. Flaxseed and its lignan and oil components reduce mammary tumor growth at a late stage of carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 1996;17:1373�6.

15. Fritsche KL, Johnston PV. Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid on growth, metastasis, fatty acid profile and prostaglandin production of two murine mammary adenocarcinomas. J Nutr 1990;120:1601�9.

16. Cave WT Jr. Dietary n-3 (omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid effects on animal tumorigenesis. FASEB J 1991;5:2160�6 [review].

17. Braden LM, Carroll KK. Dietary polyunsaturated fat in relation to mammary carcinogenesis in rats. Lipids 1986;21:285�8.

18. De Stefani E, Deneo-Pellegrini H, Mendilaharsu M, Ronco A. Essential fatty acids and breast cancer; a case-control study in Uruguay. Int J Cancer 1998;76:491�4.

19. Bougnoix P. Alpha-linolenic acid content of adipose breast tissue: a host determinant of the risk of early metastasis in breast cancer. Br J Cancer 1994;70:330�40.

20. Pandalai PK, Pilat MJ, Yamazaki K, et al. The effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on in vitro prostate cancer growth. Anticancer Res 1996;16:815�20.

21. Giovannucci E, Rimm EB, Colditz GA, et al. A prospective study of dietary fat and risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1993;85:1571�9.

22. Harvei S, Bjerve KS, Tretli S, et al. Prediagnostic level of fatty acids in serum phospholipids: omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the risk of prostate cancer. Int J Cancer 1997;71:545�51.

23. Gann PH, Hennekens CH, Sacks FM, et al. Prospective study of plasma fatty acids and risk of prostate cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1994;86:281�6.

24. Schuurman AG, van den Brandt PA, Dorant E, et al. Association of energy and fat intake with prostate carcinoma risk: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Cancer 1999;86:1019�27.

25. Shields PG, Xu GX, Blot WJ, et al. Mutagens from heated Chinese and U.S. cooking oils. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995;87:836�41.

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